Course Offerings - Spring 2019

ANT 163

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Dr. Anton Jacobs 
MWF: 1-1:50 p.m.

Students learn a comparative, contextualized, holistic approach to understanding the diversity of world cultures, including their own. Topics include family, kinship and marriage, language and communication, religion, economic systems, political systems, gender, ethnicity and race, and culture change.

ART  110

ELEMENTS OF ART
Ms. Lisa Towers
M: 11-11:50 a.m.

Covers the basic language and concepts of art and design as well as the basics of art appreciation and analysis. Students are exposed to the world of visual art in all of its mediums. Students will look at, research, write about, and make works of art as they learn about art and its significance. Due to the studio component, this course meets 1 hour per week.

ART 275

TOPICS: Applied & Fine Arts
Ms. Lisa Towers
T/TH: 9-10:15 a.m.

Provides an opportunity for advanced art students to pursue special interests in art, art history, or art appreciation. Topics are chosen by the instructor and students according to the students’ area of interest. Requirements and the structure of the class will be determined by the topic, and a contract written within the first week of classes and signed by the teacher and student will state the terms expected of each student.

ART 377

CONTEMPORARY AND WORLD ART
Ms. Lisa Towers
T/TH: 10:30-11:45 a.m.

This course engages the visual arts of various cultures and times as a way of understanding what it is to be human by exploring themes such as survival, religion, politics, social advocacy, and identity through the creation of art, architecture, and media.
 

COM 160

PUBLIC SPEAKING
Dr. Yasmin Rioux
T/TH: 10:30-11:45 a.m.

A performance class that teaches skills and theory of public oratory; provides guided practice in preparation and delivery of informative and persuasive speeches. Focuses on extemporaneous delivery, but will include work with scripted and impromptu methods of speaking.

ENG  090

BASIC WRITING
Dr. Marilyn Taylor
T/TH: 9-9:50 a.m.

Required for new students with native or near-native proficiency in English whose writing placement tests indicate a need for review of fundamentals in preparation for essay writing in ENG 111. Emphasizes standard grammar and syntax in effective sentences and paragraphs. Students must demonstrate proficiency in these skills in order to earn the grade of "C-" or better required for registration in ENG 111.

ENG  110

APPROACHES TO LITERATURE
Dr. Marilyn Taylor
F: 11-11:50 a.m.

Explains and applies fundamental terms and concepts used in interpretation of poetry, drama and short story. Taken concurrently with ENG 111 or after.
 

ENG  111

EXPOSITORY COMMUNICATION
Dr. Marilyn Taylor
MWF: 9-9:50 a.m.

Teaches the writing of expository essays with emphasis on purpose, focus, thesis, patterns of organization, coherence, and control of style.

ENG  112

ACADEMIC WRITING
Dr. Yasmin Rioux
T/TH: 2-3:15 p.m.

Prepares students to conduct purposeful research and write effective reports, analyses, research papers and other forms of writing commonly required in higher education. Teaches research skills, rhetorical principles, and proper documentation of sources.

ENG  316

CREATIVE WRITING
Dr. Marilyn Taylor
MWF: 3-3:50 p.m.

Introduces genres, models, strategies, and forms. Features regular writing practice, workshops and revision of students' poetry, short stories, short dramatic pieces, and creative nonfiction.

ENG  354

CONTEMPORARY WORLD LITERATURE
Dr. Marilyn Taylor
T/TH: 10:30-11:45 a.m.

Features analysis of distinctive literary contexts and approaches to important contemporary social issues reflected in prose and poetry from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas—most published in or translated into English in the last ten years. Texts will vary. Seminar format.
 

ENS 212

INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Dr. Cathi Cleary
MWF: 11-11:50 a.m.

Surveys the scientific knowledge and methods that are key to understanding critical concerns in human-environmental relations. Topics include energy and matter, ecosystems and how they operate, climate, species interactions, principles of environmental sustainability, population dynamics, and biodiversity in relationship to evolution.
 

ENS 412

ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY II: Environmental Stewardship
Dr. Cathi Cleary
T/TH 10:30-11:45 a.m.

Addresses issues in human-environment relations using a similar approach as in Environment and Society I, but at a higher level of complexity. Focuses on concerns such as energy, air pollution and climate disruption, solid and hazardous waste, environment and human health, and environmental economics, politics and justice.
 

HIS  212

WORLD HISTORY II
Dr. Anton Jacobs
MWF: 3-3:50 p.m.

Continues the story of the human community beginning with the Rise of the West and the Age of Exploration, surveying major concepts such as the growth of colonialism, nationalism and the various political ideologies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and their impact on Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America.

HUM 101

FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Dr. Daniel Williams
W: 10-10:50 a.m.

Prepares students for life in college and develops a range of academic skills, including critical and creative thinking, library research and the use of electronic technology for learning. Required of all first semester students.

ICS 111

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
Dr. Yasmin Rioux
MWF: 10-10:50 a.m.

In today’s globalized world, interaction with people of diverse cultural backgrounds is becoming increasingly common, making intercultural communication necessary for social harmony and organizational success. This course will provide the theoretical, methodological and ethnographic tools to understand the tenets and implications of intercultural communication at all scales—interpersonal through global—and to acquire skills and attitudes that increase intercultural competence

ICS 331

GLOBALIZATION: II IMPACT ON SOCIETY AND CULTURE
Dr. Mathew Kanjirathinkal
T/TH: 2-3:15 p.m.

The 1st part of the course studies how migrations and the ‘new media’ are creating spaces of intercultural encounter worldwide. The 2nd part explores consequent social conflicts around race and ethnicity, class and creed, sex and gender.
 

ICS 375

SPECIAL TOPICS: Slavery & Religion in the Americas
Dr. Sam Cunningham
T/TH: 9-10:15 a.m.

This course explores the institution and development of slavery in the Americas, often described as one of the great social tragedies in the colonization and historical development of these continents. The role of religion will be examined because it has acted as a defender of slavery as well as a call for the abolition of slavery. And for many who were enslaved, religion became a means of rebellion (for example, voodoo, African-American spirituals, etc.). Particular attention will focus on the history of religious debate about slavery in the Americas and the Caribbean.
 

ICS 475

ADVANCED TOPICS: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Trauma and Healing
Brian McLauchlin, SVD
MWF: 9-9:50 a.m.

Explores trauma and the profound effect it has on people’s lives around the world. Examines the role of culture in determining how to promote healing from trauma and subsequently build resilience. Reviews trauma and healing from a cross-cultural perspective, both within the US context and within other cultural contexts worldwide. Asserts that trauma cannot only be healed through a western-based psychological approach, but also through non-western therapeutic cultural interventions that promote healing.
 

MAT  121

INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE MATHEMATICS
Dr. Cathi Cleary
MWF: 2-2:50 p.m.

Examines college mathematics and its relation to other disciplines. Introduces elementary number theory, probability, statistics and linear algebra and practical math applications. Prerequisite: passing grade on mathematics placement test or completion of MAT 090 with a grade of "C-" or better.

MAT 090

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA
Dr. Cathi Cleary
T/TH: 2-2:50 p.m.

Reviews algebra skills and prepares students for MAT 121. Required for all students who do not pass the mathematics placement test. Class meets three hours per week.
 

MUS  110

ELEMENTS OF MUSIC
Dr. Evelyn Dias
W: 11-11:50 a.m.

Studies the fundamentals of music notation and applied skills necessary for simple music reading and the articulation of musical ideas.
 

MUS  111

EAR TRAINING AND SIGHT SINGING
Dr. Evelyn Dias

Ear training and sight singing for those interested in advancing theory skills and practical application of music reading.
 

MUS  121

APPLIED PIANO
Dr. Evelyn Dias

Offers individual piano instruction. The course progresses at the student's rate with exercises and repertoire.

MUS  261

LITURGICAL ENSEMBLE
Dr. Evelyn Dias

Studies in harmonization, in practice and theory, in preparation for liturgies. Students will learn to sing harmonies, read harmonic vocal lines and create harmonies for melodies of common hymns
 

MUS 190

APPLIED INSTRUMENT: Drums
Mr. Masa Iwasaki

Provides instruction in an instrument not offered in other courses at DWC. Prerequisite: permission of music faculty member.

MUS 190

APPLIED INSTRUMENT: Violin
Mr. Jenwei Yu

Provides instruction in an instrument not offered in other courses at DWC.

PHI  371

PHILOSOPHY OF GOD
Fr. Pio Estepa
MWF: 1-1:50 p.m.

Considers in detail classical, modern, and contemporary versions of the most important arguments for the existence of God, such as the ontological argument and the cosmological argument. Also examined are the nature of God, the nature of religious experience, the problem of evil, and the analysis of religious language.
 

PHI 210

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
Dr. Joseph Hartel
MWF: 9-9:50 a.m.

Compares philosophical world views of Plato and Aristotle. Includes consideration of philosophers who precede (Pre-Socratics and Socrates) and may include those who follow (Epicurus, the Stoics, and the Skeptics).
 

PHI 215

ETHICS
Fr. Pablito Tagura
MWF: 10-10:50 a.m.

Considers and assesses major historical and contemporary ethical theories such as natural law theory, virtue ethics, Kantianism, utilitarianism and the philosophical issues involved in these theories. Analyzes some contemporary problems in light of ethical norms.

PHI 330

MODERN PHILOSOPHY
Dr. Joseph Hartel
T/TH: 9-10:15 a.m.

Examines the dispute between rationalism and empiricism in the modern period, leading to the dominance of Kant’s critical philosophy. Philosophers studied may include Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.
 

PHI 335

EPISTEMOLOGY
Fr. Pablito Tagura
MWF: 2-2:50 p.m.

Studies knowledge and its objects and related concepts such as belief, certainty, and truth. Investigates skepticism and the possibility of knowledge, the sources and methods of acquiring knowledge, and the possible limits of human knowledge.

PHI 373

PHILOSOPHICAL COUNSELING
Dr. Joseph Hartel
MWF: 11-11:50 a.m.

Philosophical counseling consists of a trained philosopher helping a person deal with a problem or issue of concern. It involves a study of a person’s ideas and how they affect his/her life—and how changing their ideas can change their life. This course is both a theoretical and practical formation course for philosophical counseling. Current theories and methods are examined, including Socratic dialogue, conceptual analysis, phenomenological exploration, thought experimentation, critical thinking, PEACE, and listening through philosophers of the eastern and western tradition. Students will develop practical philosophical counseling skills (active listening, empathy, non-judgmental acceptance) and apply these to particular cases through classroom role play.

PHI 375

SPECIAL TOPICS: Media Communication Ethics
Dr. Roman Ciapalo
T/TH: 2-3:15 p.m.

This course consists of two parts. In the first part, relatively brief and introductory, we will examine the general principles and theories that are operative in the philosophical consideration of any moral issue. In the second part, we will apply these principles and theories to the key moral issues related to media communication (journalism, Internet, social media, television, radio) through study, discussion, and debate – primarily through a case-study approach. The objective of this course will be to offer the student opportunities to study and refine the techniques necessary to make good, rational decisions about moral issues in media communication.
 

PHI 423

EXISTENTIALISM
Dr. Roman Ciapalo
T/TH: 3:30-4:45 p.m.

The powerful emphasis that contemporary philosophy places on the philosophy of the human person is due largely to the influence of existentialism and phenomenology. In this course we will study and discuss the key existential themes covered by major European thinkers. Our analysis will also include a consideration of phenomenology. Authors discussed may include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Marcel, Jaspers, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy.

PHI 498

SENIOR SEMINAR
Dr. Joseph Hartel
MW: 3-3:50 p.m.

The Senior Seminar assesses students’ degree of synthesis of philosophical knowledge by challenging them to identify philosophical views and presuppositions in non-philosophical works, such as novels, dramas, poems, films, and works of visual art. Students must draw on their philosophical knowledge in such areas as ethics, philosophy of human nature, epistemology, and metaphysics in order to succeed in the course. Prerequisite: PHI 440, Seniors only. Must be taken concurrently with PHI 499.

PHI 499

SENIOR SYNTHESIS CAPSTONE
Fr. Pablito Tagura
F: 3-3:50 p.m.

The Senior Synthesis Capstone assesses students’ ability to apply appropriate methods of philosophical analysis and argument to critical issues of contemporary or perennial relevance, and to propose viable responses to these issues in the context of a major research paper and public presentation. Prerequisite: PHI 440, Seniors only. Must be taken concurrently with PHI 498.
 

PSY 394

CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
Fr. Ken Anich
T/TH: 3:30-4:45 p.m.

Examines how different aspects of an individual’s culture (e.g. religion, gender roles, ethnicity) influence behavior, emotion, and cognition. Cultural differences are explored from a psychological perspective in order to understand what psychological constructs have universal validity and which are culturally specific. A variety of issues that will help students understand and relate to people from different cultural backgrounds are examined.
 

SOC 341

THEORIES OF SOCIETY AND CULTURE
Dr. Mathew Kanjirathinkal
MWF: 1-1:50 p.m.

This course explores the interface between sociology and cultural anthropology. It surveys the range of theories revolving around society and culture. It will highlight conceptual tools and interpretive frames useful for social and cultural research.

SPA  122

FUNDAMENTAL SPANISH II
Ms. Trini Olivera Gomez-Llambi
T/TH: 3:35-4:50 p.m.

Continues the introduction of basic grammatical vocabulary of the language. Includes the major indicative verb tenses as well as the present subjunctive mood. All four languge skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) are emphasized. Includes cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. Fundamental language classes meet five times per week.
 

SPA  224

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II
Ms. Trini Olivera Gomez-Llambi
MWF: 4-4:50 p.m.

Continues to review and refine knowledge acquired in the previous Spanish courses and to build students' proficiency through reading, writing, listening skills and discussion of the content of print, audio and video materials

TRS 211

OLD TESTAMENT
Fr. Khoa Nguyen
T/TH:9-10:15 a.m.

Introduces the primary content, themes, and figures of the Hebrew Scriptures, with an emphasis on the manner in which the Hebrew Scriptures came to be written. A review of the major theological narrative of Israel’s Sacred History will be central to the course, including the following components: creation, patriarchs, exodus, judges, monarchy, prophets, exile, and restoration.
 

TRS 232

PUBLIC WITNESS REFLECTION SKILLS
Fr. Long Phi Nguyen
MWF: 3-3:50 p.m.

Students will be introduced to public proclamation that is grounded in the document on liturgical preaching entitled Fulfilled in Your Hearing, published by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. The course introduces students to proclaiming liturgical readings, leading prayer, and learning the practical dynamics of preaching (especially preparation methods, presentation skills, and critical review) tested in actual preaching opportunities. Competencies include public speaking and proclamation, coherent organization, convincing presentation, and critique of speaking skills.

TRS 253

CHRISTIAN ETHICS
Fr. Stephen Kha Nguyen
MWF: 11-11:50 a.m.

Examines the development and formulation of Christian ethical principles and methods based on Scripture, Catholic tradition and teaching, and philosophical and theological reflection. Introduces basic tenants of the Christian moral life, including the nature of the human person as a free and self-determined moral agent, the nature and function of conscience, and human sexuality. Also explores the Church's social teaching regarding emerging moral issues in medicine, technology, politics, human rights, and environment as applicable to contemporary life and Christian commitment.

TRS 273

PASTORAL CARE
Sr. Theresa Marie Tran
MWF: 1-1:50 p.m.

Explores both the personal qualities and the interpersonal skills that help create a welcoming and compassionate presence. In the setting of biblical spirituality and pastoral theology, with a shared process involving personal reflection and experiential practice, students address two fundamental components of pastoral care: 1) Self-awareness and growth in the personal qualities of compassion involving culturally diverse experiences. 2) Practice in the learned art/skill of interpersonal communication, with an emphasis on creativity and respecting diversity. Students examine the practice and significance of the Catholic approach to naming grace in personal and communal life and history.

TRS 322

SVD HERITAGE & MISSION
Fr. Pio Estepa
MF: 10-10:50 a.m.

A general introduction to the heritage and mission of the Society of the Divine Word (SVD), beginning with an overview of the early history of the SVD focused on St. Arnold Janssen and other members of the Founding Generation. Subsequent topics include SVD prayer and spirituality, the SVD missionary paradigm of Prophetic Dialogue, the SVD in North America, and the SVD global mission today.

TRS 336

ECCLESIOLOGY
Fr. Khoa Nguyen
MWF: 9-9:50 a.m.

Studies the biblical, historical, and theological development of the Church in its redemptive role, structure, and ministry. Special attention is given to issues challenging the Church today – the magisterium, secularism, atheism, ecumenism, and the Church’s role and relation to other religions in a religiously pluralist context.

TRS 353

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING
Fr. Stephen Nguyen
T/TH: 10:30-11:45 a.m.

Provides an historical, theoretical, and practical overview of the primary principles and themes of the Catholic social encyclical tradition. Explores moral issues in medicine, technology, politics, economy, ecology, and human rights. Also evaluates Christian social responsibilities in the areas of peace-building, justice, reconciliation, and the integrity of creation

TRS 475

ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS: Problem of Evil
Fr. Stephen Kha Nguyen
MWF: 2-2:50 p.m.

Explores various advanced-level topics in the areas of theology and religious studies.

TRS 499

SENIOR SYNTHESIS CAPSTONE
Fr. Khoa Nguyen
W: 4-4:50 p.m.

The Senior Synthesis Capstone (TRS 499) assesses students’ ability to apply appropriate methods of theological analysis to critical issues of contemporary relevance and to propose viable alternative solutions in the context of a major research paper and public presentation. Students develop and articulate a personal synthesis of their previous studies in areas such as: God, Christ, Church, Prayer & Spirituality, Sacramental & Liturgical Theology, Sacred Scripture, Catholic Social Teaching, Ecumenism & Interreligious Dialogue, and Missiology & SVD Prophetic Dialogue.

 

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